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Certain Women (2016) Reviewed By Jay

United States, 24 December 2015

 

Jay´s Review

This is Art, not Entertainment, interpret this however you like. In my opinion, this is a lot like watching paint dry.... One thing is sure: contemporary Montana looks depressing and COLD.

 

 

 

Director Kelly Reichardt ("Wendy and Lucy" - we should have known...), inspired by the short stories by Maile Meloy, has written a screenplay which features the lives of three women trying to make the best of some poor situations.

 

 

 

The cast::

 

  • * Michelle Williams (have you ever seen "Me Without You"? Amazing...) Gina Lewis has spotted some rock from a demolished school house. She wants to reuse it in a house she and her husband are building. Her teenage daughter is surly.
  • * Kristen Stewart ("Café Society") plays Beth Travis, teaching an adult education class but she has to commute four hours each way. She wants to be a lawyer.
  • * Lily Gladstone ("Winter in the Blood") Jamie likes Beth, not her class. She raises horses.
  • * Laura Dern ("The Fault in Our Stars") Laura Wells can tell her clients the law but they don't believe it until a man says the same thing.  She gets frustrated.
  • * Jarad Harris ("The Man From U.N.C.L.E.") Fuller always knew he had been cheated and now he's reached a breaking point. He wants justice.
  • * John Getz ("Trumbo") George knows Laura is the right person for the police to send into a hostage situation...but he does have her wear a bullet-proof vest. Better safe than sorry.
  • * Rene Auberjonois ("Madam Secretary") Albert isn't one to over-think a problem and that rock pile has been there for years.

Expect a few adult situations, but a lot of silence. These people don't talk much and when they do, it is terse, mumbled and not very loud. If you really want to try to figure out what is happening and have a hearing problem, be warned: You will need captions. But you will love the Corgi!

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